Earlier this year we participated in FOSDEM 2012 in Brussels, Belgium. Overall the event was a major success and we're very happy we were able to take part in it!

For FOSDEM 2013, we'll be back in Brussels and participating in a major way. The first day of FOSDEM (February 2, 2013) will be the 2nd birthday for the Jenkins project, and seems appropriate that project founder Kohsuke Kawaguchi will be giving a keynote session titled: "How we made the Jenkins community"

Here's an excerpt from Kohsuke's talk proposal:

Jenkins project has an interesting history. It started from scratch on my spare time, and grow over time to boast 600+ open-source plugins developed by 300+ contributors from all around the world.

There are several key ingredients, both technical and social, that enabled this model, and I think those ingredients are useful to other projects. In this talk, I'll discuss how Jenkins project and the community works, what these ingredients are, why they help you attract more developers into your projects, and why it matters.

You can read more about Kohsuke's keynote here

In addition to the keynote, I (R. Tyler Croy), and a number of members of the Jenkins, Cucumber and Selenium communities are hosting the first ever Testing and Automation devroom at FOSDEM.

If you're interested in submitting a talk proposal for the dev room the deadline is 23:59 UTC on December 21st 2012! The Call for Proposals can be found here, and the proposal submission form can can be found here.

We are very likely going to have a table in the hall again this year, but the FOSDEM committee hasn't yet confirmed whether or not we will have a table.

Regardless, a lot of Jenkins community members will be at FOSDEM in February in addition to hundreds of other open source contributors and users from around the world.

If you're interested in participating and/or meeting up with the Jenkins crowd, there's details coming together on the FOSDEM wiki page.

We hope to see you there!

About the Author
R. Tyler Croy

R. Tyler Croy has been part of the Jenkins project for the past seven years. While avoiding contributing any Java code, Tyler is involved in many of the other aspects of the project which keep it running, such as this website, infrastructure, governance, etc.